Allen Baler: Ditch the Holiday Party, Plan This Instead

Allen Baler Skip the Holiday Party

It’s called “the most wonderful time of the year…”

 

The holidays.

 

Festive lights, shopping, parties, and people enjoying time with friends and family.

 

Many companies like to show employees their appreciation by throwing a holiday bash, with food, booze, and even some quality entertainment.

 

While this is a wonderful sentiment, you might want to re-think having your brouhaha during this hectic time of the year.

 

The reason? Well, to be blunt… holiday stress.

 

Many employees are having a hard time keeping their heads above water – juggling social engagements, school activities for the kids, holiday shopping, and travel arrangements. In reality, the last thing they need right now is another obligation to fill up their already full calendar.

 

And while you still might want to recognize your team with a card or something low-key, there’s an alternative to the holiday fete that you may want to consider:

 

A January Jam.

 

This year, considering the fact that much of our team is remote and has to travel to Nashville for company meetings, we opted to skip the holiday festivities in lieu of a January post-holiday party to coincide with our first quarter planning.

 

The idea behind it is simple, yet very strategic.

 

With the holidays a recent eggnog-soaked memory, your people will be fresh and focused to tackle the tasks before them with renewed vigor. There won’t be any distractions of leaving to attend Junior’s Christmas pageant or visit Grandma at her retirement community. Your employees’ attention will be only on the road ahead.

 

After you enjoy a day or two planning your market domination and department-specific quarterly metrics, take a load off and celebrate both the past year’s accomplishments and the new year’s promise with a lively affair that everyone will enjoy and remember.

 

Allen Baler is a leading entrepreneur and Harvard grad. Allen Baler is a Partner in 4Patriots LLC, based in Nashville.

Disclaimer: This blog post is not a substitute for the sound advice of a business professional with expertise in the subject matter discussed. Please seek appropriate counsel on what strategies make sense for your business.